Mark Leckey, Circa ‘87, 2013. Pigment-based color print. 13 x 19 in.
Mark Leckey’s solo exhibition, On Pleasure Bent, at the Hammer Museum is reviewed in Art In America by Jennifer Krasinski. 

The 13 works in the exhibition, “On Pleasure Bent,” are largely propelled by the British artist’s long-standing practice of aggregation and assembly, of search and deploy—stringing found materials along new threads, uncovering the life forces of images, footage and objects to blur the boundaries of memory and reverie, artifact and fiction. The titular minute-long video is a teaser for Leckey’s moving-image memoir of the same name (scheduled for completion next year). The memoir consists of what he calls “found memories,” media that he believes formed him, shaped his desires and his sense of pleasure, and perhaps, too, his art. Scenes from a strip tease, a close-up of fishnet stockings, shots of transmission towers, a Kate Bush performance and other archival materials are dreamily edited together over a languid score. In a telling sequence, we watch a dolly shot down a grand hallway. A silhouetted figure steps into the frame and walks toward a brightly lit gallery at the end of the hall. Suddenly, the light changes, our eyes refocus, and the scene proves to be but a trick: a process shot filmed in the studio, with Leckey walking toward projected footage as though in search of a way into the images.  

Mark Leckey, Circa ‘87, 2013. Pigment-based color print. 13 x 19 in.

Mark Leckey’s solo exhibition, On Pleasure Bent, at the Hammer Museum is reviewed in Art In America by Jennifer Krasinski. 

The 13 works in the exhibition, “On Pleasure Bent,” are largely propelled by the British artist’s long-standing practice of aggregation and assembly, of search and deploy—stringing found materials along new threads, uncovering the life forces of images, footage and objects to blur the boundaries of memory and reverie, artifact and fiction. The titular minute-long video is a teaser for Leckey’s moving-image memoir of the same name (scheduled for completion next year). The memoir consists of what he calls “found memories,” media that he believes formed him, shaped his desires and his sense of pleasure, and perhaps, too, his art. Scenes from a strip tease, a close-up of fishnet stockings, shots of transmission towers, a Kate Bush performance and other archival materials are dreamily edited together over a languid score. In a telling sequence, we watch a dolly shot down a grand hallway. A silhouetted figure steps into the frame and walks toward a brightly lit gallery at the end of the hall. Suddenly, the light changes, our eyes refocus, and the scene proves to be but a trick: a process shot filmed in the studio, with Leckey walking toward projected footage as though in search of a way into the images.  

Tania Bruguera feature from Art in America magazine.
http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/features/tania-bruguera/
It offers a nice overview of the unfolding and progression of her work.

Tania Bruguera feature from Art in America magazine.

http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/features/tania-bruguera/

It offers a nice overview of the unfolding and progression of her work.