Pratchaya Phinthong, Allemansroetten, 2011. Wooden tower set up by Alessandro Rabottini. Courtesy of the artist and gb agency, Paris. View of the exhibition Give More Than You Take - GAMeC, 2011. Photo Jacopo Menzani. Courtesy GAMeC - Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo.
Daily Serving’s Luise Guest posts her review of the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, on view at the Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) through April 14, 2013. 

[T]he lower level of the gallery is dominated by the largest representation to date of work from Papua New Guinea, including masks and structures from the Sepik River. They are intended to represent one of the exhibition’s stated themes: how the built environment influences the way that people engage with their surroundings, with an emphasis on ephemeral structures and collaborative works. Whether powerful ritual objects such as these can easily be made to fit into such a curatorial conceit is debatable. QAGOMA Acting Director Suhanya Raffel says the exhibition is about “registering difference, considering change, mapping regeneration” –  the politics of identity and geography in a rapidly changing world. This latter idea is more easily identified, and many works reflect on colonialism, dispossession and power relationships.

The exhibition features work by over 75 artists including Pratchaya Phinthong, Raqs Media Collective, Heman Chong, Slavs & Tatars, An-My Le, The Propeller Group and many others. 

Pratchaya Phinthong, Allemansroetten, 2011. Wooden tower set up by Alessandro Rabottini. Courtesy of the artist and gb agency, Paris. View of the exhibition Give More Than You Take - GAMeC, 2011. Photo Jacopo Menzani. Courtesy GAMeC - Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo.

Daily Serving’s Luise Guest posts her review of the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, on view at the Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) through April 14, 2013. 

[T]he lower level of the gallery is dominated by the largest representation to date of work from Papua New Guinea, including masks and structures from the Sepik River. They are intended to represent one of the exhibition’s stated themes: how the built environment influences the way that people engage with their surroundings, with an emphasis on ephemeral structures and collaborative works. Whether powerful ritual objects such as these can easily be made to fit into such a curatorial conceit is debatable. QAGOMA Acting Director Suhanya Raffel says the exhibition is about “registering difference, considering change, mapping regeneration” –  the politics of identity and geography in a rapidly changing world. This latter idea is more easily identified, and many works reflect on colonialism, dispossession and power relationships.

The exhibition features work by over 75 artists including Pratchaya Phinthong, Raqs Media Collective, Heman Chong, Slavs & Tatars, An-My Le, The Propeller Group and many others.